Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape



United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandEurope and North AmericaCornwall and Devon CountiesN50 8 10 W5 23 1200619,719CulturalTo exhibit an important interchange of human values - over a span of time or within a cultural area of the world - on developments in architecture or technology; monumental arts; town-planning or landscape designTo bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization which is living or which has disappearedTo be an outstanding example of a type of building; architectural or technological ensemble or landscape which illustrates (a) significant stage(s) in human historyCommercial developmentMiningSolid waste1215http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1215http://whc.unesco.org/en/soc/?action=list&id_site=1215Much of the landscape of Cornwall and West Devon was transformed in the 18th and early 19th centuries as a result of the rapid growth of pioneering copper and tin mining. Its deep underground mines, engine houses, foundries, new towns, smallholdings, ports and harbours, and their ancillary industries together reflect prolific innovation which, in the early 19th century, enabled the region to produce two-thirds of the world’s supply of copper. The substantial remains are a testimony to the contribution Cornwall and West Devon made to the Industrial Revolution in the rest of Britain and to the fundamental influence the area had on the mining world at large. Cornish technology embodied in engines, engine houses and mining equipment was exported around the world. Cornwall and West Devon were the heartland from which mining technology rapidly spread.World Heritage Site
CountryUnited Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
UNESCO RegionEurope and North America
LocationCornwall and Devon Counties
CoordinatesN50 8 10 W5 23 1
Inscription Date2006
Property (ha)19,719
Type of HeritageCultural
CriteriaTo exhibit an important interchange of human values - over a span of time or within a cultural area of the world - on developments in architecture or technology; monumental arts; town-planning or landscape design
CriteriaTo bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization which is living or which has disappeared
CriteriaTo be an outstanding example of a type of building; architectural or technological ensemble or landscape which illustrates (a) significant stage(s) in human history
All ThreatsCommercial development
All ThreatsMining
All ThreatsSolid waste
Unesco Reference Number1215
URLhttp://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1215
State of Conservation Reporthttp://whc.unesco.org/en/soc/?action=list&id_site=1215
DescriptionMuch of the landscape of Cornwall and West Devon was transformed in the 18th and early 19th centuries as a result of the rapid growth of pioneering copper and tin mining. Its deep underground mines, engine houses, foundries, new towns, smallholdings, ports and harbours, and their ancillary industries together reflect prolific innovation which, in the early 19th century, enabled the region to produce two-thirds of the world’s supply of copper. The substantial remains are a testimony to the contribution Cornwall and West Devon made to the Industrial Revolution in the rest of Britain and to the fundamental influence the area had on the mining world at large. Cornish technology embodied in engines, engine houses and mining equipment was exported around the world. Cornwall and West Devon were the heartland from which mining technology rapidly spread.
StatusWorld Heritage Site